• Boxcutter: The Dissolve

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by Andrew Ryce Source: (Fact Magazine)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    Boxcutter’s last album Arecibo Message showed the Northern Irish producer move away from the punishing dubstep structures of his first two records and let the influences that used to eat away at the edges of his half-step fully fly, but the album’s resulting unfocused sprawl felt counter-intuitive. His fourth, The Dissolve, begins with hesitant shuffling before bursting out into streaks of neon-dyed funk in ‘Panama’, and its exaggerated
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  • The Dissolve

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by Joseph Burnett Source: (Dusted Magazine)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    Back in 2006, Northern Irish producer Boxcutter’s debut album, Oneiric, was lumped into the then-nascent dubstep genre, despite the fact that Barry Lynn’s music was only slightly redolent of the atmospheres and stylistic tendencies of that particular strand of U.K. garage. Sure, there was a slight coloration of two-step beats and urbane synth flourishes here and there, but Oneiric (and indeed its follow-up, Glyphic) owed more to Autechre and
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  • Boxcutter The Dissolve

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by George Bass Source: (Coke Machine Glow)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    If you look up Boxcutter on dubstepforum.net, you’ll see the Irishman’s appearances are akin to Halley’s Comet: infrequent, blazing, not seen by nearly enough people. It isn’t his fault the scene’s become crowded with kids in search of inner ear damage. Perhaps that’s why The Dissolve, Barry Lynn’s fourth full-length, takes bolder and bolder scalpel strokes to create 49 minutes of dubstep, trying so hard to be the opposite of the
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  • Boxcutter – The Dissolve

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by Patrick Fennelly Source: (State Magazine)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    When people think of electronic music it is usually Warp Records or Ninja Tune/Big Dada that gets all the plaudits. However it is Planet Mu and its founder Mike Paradinas, that has, for 16 years now, produced consistently good electronica and dance music, yet is often forced to live in the shadow of the former dance giants. It is the slightly more obscure variation of artists that has, perhaps, left Planet Mu in the dark a little, however, Northern
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