• Album Review: Boxcutter / ‘The Dissolve’ (Planet Mu)

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by Matt Oliver Source: (Big Shot)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    Given Boxcutter’s definitive savagery of Oneiric, Barry Lynn’s adoption of an electro-funk posture requires patience if you’ve heard the name and think you have a handle on him. Not because it’s poorly produced or disconcertingly relaxed — if you’re expecting a slick, star-dusted record for the lounge, not only are you a psychic/liar, but you’re in for a good time — but a downsizing from dubstep demon-beating to plush disco-brushed coolness makes his
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  • Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by Michaelangelo Matos Source: (Resident Advisor)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    Irish dubstep producer Barry Lynn probably isn't having a "moment" right now. Nevertheless, 2011 seems to be a fortuitous one for his visibility. As Boxcutter, Lynn's graduated from the more obviously edgy early work his name conjures to a rather graceful and antic take on the hardcore continuum. He's matured. But even as he does so, he's taken to heart the model of classic early '90s jungle labels like Moving Shadow and Suburban Base: Keep it lively and even silly,
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  • Boxcutter The Dissolve

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by Javier Blánquez Source: (Playground)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    When listening to “The Dissolve” from start to finish, the first thing that becomes clear is that Planet Mu decided to release the vinyl of “Alelle”, the big taster for Boxcutter’s fourth album on the label, as some kind of distraction. The sound of that nervous and slippery track doesn’t correspond to the rest of the material, although it does to Barry Lynn’s sound in general: complex, dynamic, fractured breaks inspired by Moving Shadow-like
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  • Boxcutter The Dissolve Review

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by Mike Diver Source: (BBC Music)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    Despite us critics continually trying to place them into ill-fitting boxes, the very best ‘dance’ artists thrive on never letting the listener get a proper handle on them – on what to expect, and where a record is going once it’s begun. This is true of Barry Lynn, aka Boxcutter, who chops myriad influences into bite-size pieces before sprinkling them atop his latest LP. The end product is awash with intriguing reference points while simultaneously sounding
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