The Internal Tulips – Mislead into A Field By A Deformed Deer

  • The Internal Tulips - Mislead Into A Field By A Deformed Deer

    Reviewed by Sam Constable Source: (Cityfliers)

    <b> The Internal Tulips </b> - Mislead Into A Field By A Deformed Deer

    From past experience we all know Planet Mu delivers the goods. Since its conception it’s yet to bring you anything your ears didn’t want to hear and has always been a merchant of the new and experimental. The Internal Tulips are no exception to the rule, and with a LP entitled “Mislead into A Field By A Deformed Deer”, with such phenomenal track names such as “1/2 Retarded Tuner Of Hurricanes”, “Dead Arm Blues” & “Invalid Terrence”, I truly had no idea what to expect.

    Background research turned up next to nothing on these guys, and although slightly shady (who doesn’t have a myspace, what are they hiding?!) It was refreshing to find an act not ranting about their past endeavours and how good they are. From what I can gather, The Internal Tulips is a coming together of two artists Electric Company aka Brad Laner, and Lexaunculpt aka Alex Graham. Both with separate album releases on Planet Mu going back a few years, both coming into the realm of abstract chill out of the electronic nature.

    Admittedly the first time I listened to the album, I was less than impressed – being quite unsure of what it was I was actually listening. As with all music, it takes a couple of spins to appreciate the beauty of anything, and a short time later my ears were firmly tuned in. “Mislead Into A Field By A Deformed Deer” combines essences of psychedelia, acoustic, vocal harmonies and elements of retro sounds such as the Beatles and The Beach Boys. Together the pair have intricately layered these far reaching aspects into each other through modern day electronics, and their own very unique approach to the whole process.

    One thing that stands out to me about the album, is its use of silence. I remember reading an article about Richie Hawtin, and how he discussed the importance of silence, and how often this is over looked. Wise words from the Plastikman, silence is just as much an instrument as the guitar, piano, et al when used in the contents of music, and The Internal Tulip use it in such a way. Breaking the tracks in sections but not disjointing its flow, drawing more depth into it and giving strength to other elements.

    Although not my preferred sound, I found the album extremely interesting. The approach Brad & Alex took completely blew me away, and reflecting on the album it’s made me think about music in general, its composition, structure and how they are approached. I’m intrigued to look into their previous solo releases and see the progression of these two separate artists, and how each helped to shape this album.

    In conclusion, this is yet more musical goodness, not just for your ear but also your mind from the Planet Mu camp.

<< Back to reviews