My Downfall

  • Venetian Snares - My Downfall (Original Soundtrack)

    Reviewed by Adam Winfield Source: (Igloo Magazine)

    Venetian Snares - My Downfall (Original Soundtrack)

    The joyfully/irritatingly (delete as applicable) prolific producer has made a typically swift return after March’s Pink + Green and June’s Sabbath Dubs with the release of his second classically-inspired album. My Downfall is the spiritual successor to 2005’s excellent Rossz Csillag Alatt Született, which is probably Aaron Funk’s most acclaimed work. This, on the other hand, is a release that is undeniably good, but nevertheless ranks alongside his more forgettable work.

    The central reason for this being that the usual mind-blowing breakcore has been omitted from all but four of the 14 tracks. Even when the beats do make a more than welcome appearance, the memorable moments that were so abundant in Rossz are intermittent at best.

    Perhaps the most satisfying factor of My Downfall is the dark and sinister feel that the music captures. The brilliantly executed orchestral instrumentation is often haunting and bleak. This is most conspicuously noticeable on tracks such as "Colourless and If I Could Say If I Love You." Another highlight is the sound of the elegantly plucked strings in "I’m Sorry I Failed You." Less remarkable tracks include the four "Holló Utca’s, "which are ultimately somewhat feeble, and the Satie-esque "Mentioning It."

    The finest of the four naturally excellent breakcore tracks comes in the form of "My Half," its splendid melodies and vigorous Amens work towards an epic climax. "My Crutch" and "The Hopeless Pursuit Of Remission" are worthy additions to Funk’s snowballing catalogue of breakcore productions. It is only "Integraation" of the four which comes close to being spoilt by a slightly overwhelming hoover.

    If you preferred the more tranquil moments of Rossz to the chaotic breakcore sections, then the chances are you will enjoy this. If not, you may be left feeling short-changed. Either way, this album is not the triumph that Rossz was.

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