• MRK1 - Copyright Laws

    Reviewed by Norman Records

    <b> MRK1 </b> - Copyright Laws

    I've listened to MRK 1 (Mark One) 'Copyright Laws' several times now and it just gets better. The Manchester Grime producer has had somewhat of a change in direction with his sound. Moving from his hip hop/ R&B flavored grime styles into dubstep territory and in the process showing many of the scenes current producers how it's done. There are some serious floor slaying basslines on here taking in some eastern influences (The sitar sound on 'Caveman
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  • MRK1 - Copyright Laws

    Reviewed by Rock-a-Rolla

    <b> MRK1 </b> - Copyright Laws

    Copyright Laws is speaker-testing music in its truest form. To call the album 'rich in bass' would be one hell of an understatement, but then you'd expect nothing less from the 2003 Sidewinder grime producer of the year. MRK1 has successfully managed to manipulate multiple genres by taking the massive low end from dubstep, the drum patterns of electro, and a little of the sampling ethic of hip-hop, producing a sound that is altogether bulky and
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  • MRK1 - Copyright Laws

    Reviewed by Subba-Culcha

    <b> MRK1 </b> - Copyright Laws

    Ever since Drum & Bass became a sad, fudged, chart friendly version of its former self, bass heads have been searching for a new poison. True grit was required, along with pounding bass and enough attitude to please the skeptics. Then Dubstep came along. Armed with its cheeky offspring, Grime, the Dubstep formula is simple. Take the essence of Jamaican dub rhythms, jam in an electronic box of tricks and then latch on bass-lines forged in the fires of
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  • MRK1 - Copyright Laws

    Reviewed by Plan B

    <b> MRK1 </b> - Copyright Laws

    The last few years have seen Manchester's MRK1 - formerly Mark One-swing from hollowed-out bass to brackish urban grime as the musical facet of Manchester crew Virus Syndicate. 'Copyright Laws' is perhaps the flipside to the burial album's hauntological, washed-out feel-still minimal, but muscular and fully corporeal, a ribcage-rattling prescence rather than a faded memory. Dubstep has a history of surfing ethnic sources for the atmospheric sonic,
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