• Julian Fane - Our New Quarters

    Reviewed by Plan B

    <b> Julian Fane </b> - Our New Quarters

    The falsettto may still provoke Thom Yorke comparisons but this is a more stripped back and rocking affair than the vancouver wunderkid's 04 debut. Giving out the goosebumps with stratospheric bombast and fat, crunchy Autechre death-piston beats is still what he does best here though.

  • Julian Fane - Our New Quarters

    Reviewed by XLR8R

    <b> Julian Fane </b> - Our New Quarters

    There are two distinctly different sides to Vancouver producer/programmer/instrumentalist Julian Fane. There's the behind the scenes boyfriend man in Lynx and Ram, a noisy electronic punk group he co-founded with his girlfriend in 2005, whose lates for sublight, 'The System's On And It's Flashing Red is a more rockin' affair than the label is used to. Then there's front man Fane, who produces icy, melodious, shoegaze vocal-IDM for Planet Mu, the latest release of
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  • Julian Fane - Our New Quarters

    Reviewed by RockSound

    <b> Julian Fane </b> - Our New Quarters

    Vancoouver based singer/songwriter Julian Fane's debut album 'Special Forces', a confident mix of wintry electronica and shoegazing guitars, made him one of the more interesting and esoteric acts signed to Mike Paradinas' ever excellent Planet Mu imprint. If anything, his second release, 'Our New Quarters' is even better, challenging its predecessor's fine line beteween melody and experimentation. Often Nordic in tone, Fane effortlessly switches between moonlit piano
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  • Julian Fane - Our New Quarters

    Reviewed by Boomkat

    <b> Julian Fane </b> - Our New Quarters

    For this follow-up to his acclaimed Special Forces album, Vancouver-dweller Julian Fane has placed far greater emphasis on more conventional song structures than its predecessor, with vocals taking a central role at every turn. Fane’s voice bears more than a passing resemblance to that of Thom Yorke, and the Radiohead frontman’s solo outing, The Eraser provides an obvious reference point. But while Yorke’s album was an exercise in minimalism (by his standards
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