• Ed Lawes - 14 Tracks/Pieces

    Reviewed by Matthew Ingram (The Wire)

    <b> Ed Lawes </b> - 14 Tracks/Pieces

    British electronic musician Ed Lawes's debut album is a set of great integrity, the product of three years' dedicated programming. 14 Tracks/Pieces follows the escape route out of Techno laid down by Autechre, even if the oldest track on the record, "Actually Real", is the only one with a hint of linear beats. But the attack is so even-paced, so gentle, that the experience is akin to hearing a fairly traditional jazz record filtered or processed.

    Lawes's
    more

  • Ed Lawes - 14 Tracks/Pieces

    Reviewed by milkfactory (themilkfactory.co.uk)

    <b> Ed Lawes </b> - 14 Tracks/Pieces

    Ed Lawes springs out of nowhere, scaring the cattle and holding onto his liner notes much too tightly. This man needs an old fashioned bobby to raise his hand, palm outwards and say NO! to him. Take for example the following (brief) quote from the liner notes: “... from a minimal range of means (the returned trumpets at the beginning) to ‘a’ maximum range (a maximum within the limits I have set) (at their most... 3 violins, 3 doublebasses, 3 clarinets, 3 tenor
    more

  • Ed Lawes - 14 Tracks/Pieces

    Reviewed by WOEBOT (WOEBOT)

    <b> Ed Lawes </b> - 14 Tracks/Pieces

    This is a set of great integrity, the product of three years dedicated programming. Lawes aesthetic lies in the netherspace between Gil Evans, Ingram Marshall, and Pierre Henry. However it's this ease with which the listener can pinpoint antecedents that slightly dogs the record. Many of the themes have a nagging similarity to music you're sure you heard once somewhere, indeed occasionally it can feel like an index of Avant-Garde dabbling. This would be a greater
    more

  • Ed Lawes - 14 Tracks/Pieces

    Reviewed by FdW (Vital Weekly) (Vital Weekly)

    <b> Ed Lawes </b> - 14 Tracks/Pieces

    Ed who?, you may very well ask, just like I did. Planet Mu doesn't
    reveal much more than that Lawes is a 'Birmingham-based musician &
    contemporary composer' and 'he divides the works between 'pieces'
    (generally scored for or improvised on more traditional instruments)
    and 'tracks' (which can be generalised as more computer-based or
    electroacoustic works)'. The pieces include studies for violin,
    double bass & tenor saxophone and mixed
    more