• Phthalocyanine - No One Said You Didn't

    Reviewed by Khosu Tuboka (gridface.com)

    Phthalocyanine - No One Said You Didn't

    If you want to hear sheep, feline roars, humans voices and other sonic stimuli dancing in harmony with pure synthesis and other various electronic tricks and gadgets, just go get this album by Phthalo head Dimitris Fergadis. Producer extraordinaire for more than a decade now, his releases are scarce, but always rewarding and favoring repeated listening. There’s no filler in these ten tracks, and it’s difficult to choose a favorite. Today I would
    more

  • Phthalocyanine - No One Said You Didn't

    Reviewed by Ali Burge (twenty4-seven.co.uk)

    Phthalocyanine - No One Said You Didn't

    Hailing from LA, Phthalocyanine's second album on Worcester's renowned Planet Mu label takes the experimental elements of his previous work and adds what is concidered pure evil by fellow practitioners: melody. Not conventional melody though, as the sounds on this album are very much off kilter. 'No One Said You Didn't' sounds at times like a war fought in a future where the only weapons are musical instruments, with snare hits mowing down lines of infantry and synths obliterating whole cities. This is what War of the Worlds was all supposed to sound like.

  • Phthalocyanine - No One Said You Didn't

    Reviewed by Ben Edwards (DJ magazine)

    Phthalocyanine - No One Said You Didn't

    It's difficult to know how to approach Dimitri Fergadis' Phthalocyanine project. For starters, it sounds like a 33rpm car crash stuck on 35. In fact, it would take the harshest, most toxic mind-bending hallucinogens to untangle this chaotic mess. Still, if you can look past the dysfunctional 2000bpm racket, lurking in the rubble are faded shades of Amon Tobin, Carl Cox in his rave days, hardcore gabba and even Belgian techno. Granted, you have to
    more

  • Phthalocyanine - No One Said You Didn't

    Reviewed by Dave Stenton (iDJ)

    Phthalocyanine - No One Said You Didn't

    It's always with a slight sense of apprehension that I greet the arrival of a new album from Planet Mu, such is the, er, 'uncompromising' nature of the music they release. So, the accompanying press material for Phthalocyanine's second album, which promised some of his 'most listenable' work yet, did little to allay the perpetual unease. I couldn't possibly describe the album (well, I can try: it sounds like David Axelrod remixing Hixxy & Sharkey.
    more