• The Gasman - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    Reviewed by Matthew Ingram (The Wire)

    <b> The Gasman </b> - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    Chris Reeves's latest release for Planet Mu is even in its weaker moments, unfailingly entertaining. The tropes introduced by The Aphex Twin through the 90s, which Reeves is unable to admit inform his work, are failsafe recipes for a solid listening experience - the breathy, helium synth stabs and tickling filigree of drums that characterize The Aphex Twin's billowing rave odysseys are powerfully seductive. Indeed there's nothing wrong with working
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  • The Gasman - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    Reviewed by Jeremy Chick (subba-culcha.com)

    <b> The Gasman </b> - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    The lights in my room are fading. The candles surrounding me flicker to a halt. The sound of something rustling outside breaks the eerie calm and a gush of wind extinguishes any chance of hope breaking through the electric blue calm of the night. These evenings are electric. I feel the presence of something upon the horizon, my door is shut and the darkness of the room begins to play tricks on my eyes. I see shadows darting across the normally still
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  • The Gasman - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    <b> The Gasman </b> - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    The least that can be said about The Gasman’s second album, The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety, is that it is a truly ambitious project. Thirty-four tracks scattered over two CDs, totalling well over two hours of processed beats, flamboyant orchestral moments and delicate constructions.

    Hailing from Portsmouth, Christopher Reeves developed an interest for electronic music while at a very young age, and began experimenting with tapes of old
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  • The Gasman - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    <b> The Gasman </b> - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    Massive double-cd set from Portsmouth’s Chris Reeves for Planet Mu, once again pairing his love of Aphex-style playful intricacies with a harrowing line in abandoned dancehall instrumentals. The opening of this album defies expectations with its dense splice-up of choral phrases and ghostly ice-rink vibes, seemingly influenced by VVM’s Caretaker and Akira Rabelais’ haunting choir re-arrangements. ‘Imodium’ does this particularly well, you
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