• Julian Fane - Special Forces

    Reviewed by James O'Brien (earlash.com)

    Julian Fane - Special Forces

    Julian Fane's new album, Special Forces, opens with a track that suggests either The Joshua Tree or the soundtrack to 2001: A Space Odyssey. Actually, what it indicates is that Radiohead have forever altered what the first track of a pop record is allowed to sound like. Three-plus minutes of tom rolls and snaking keyboards with haunting ambient vocals give ways to organ chords, and that's Fane's "Disaster Location."


    A deep-bellied cello
    more

  • Julian Fane - Special Forces

    Reviewed by Maurizio Pustianaz (chaindlk.org)

    Julian Fane - Special Forces

    Julian Fane is a young guy but he isn't an inexperienced musician. He could be young but he balanced the apparent lack of experiences, which common people would think a young guy could have, with creativity. SPECIAL FORCES is his first album and it contains so many moods and musical ambiences that you'll be surprised. Julian blends atmospheres a la Robert Wyatt (on "Safety man" and "Freezing in haunted water") with classical moments (see his piano
    more

  • Julian Fane - Special Forces

    Reviewed by James Vella (cdreviews.com)

    Julian Fane - Special Forces

    Warning: this is not your typical Planet m album. For those expecting ever-changing glitch beats and deftly woven electronica, for once m does not deliver. This, however, is no bad thing. Where the majority of m artists (here I’m thinking of Venetian Snares, m-ziq, Jega) opt for instrumental, engaging digital blips and squarks (or, in the case of Frog Pocket and edIT, digital blips and squarks nestling cosily into a backdrop of acoustic guitars and
    more

  • Julian Fane - Special Forces

    Reviewed by Paul Regelbrugge (Big Takeover magazine)

    Julian Fane - Special Forces

    Although I am typically drawn to music much more organic than this largely keyboard and computer-programmed affair, pieces in the key of such a profound melancholy as this sure do amplify the meanderings of my own soul. Swane, obviously on intimate terms with the strange bedfellows of beauty and sadness, mixes instrumentals with singing on this solitary night companion of a record. When he does sing, especially on the mesmerizing "Dark Net," he is
    more