• album: remarc

    Remarc - Sound Murderer

    Reviewed by anil 'bad bwoy' bawa (absorb.org)

    <b> Remarc </b> - Sound Murderer

    the nineties saw an unprecedented phase in the evolution of rhythm, brought on by the hedonistic pairing of technology and drugs. jungle was the death of rave; the intensification of snare/kick/hi-hat to levels that threatened to override synaptic pathways, erupt into cataclysmic chaos. rhythmn taken to a place unimaginable before personal computing. in an unlikely marriage of amphetamine rush and skunk paranoia, its anxious, restless sound both
    more

  • Remarc - Sound Murderer

    Remarc - Sound Murderer

    Reviewed by Adrian Huth (Exploding Plastic)

    <b> Remarc </b> - Sound Murderer

    A recent look at prices for Remarc 12 inch singles place these albums in the range of between $25 to $50 a pop. There is a reason as demand is high and supply is limited as the original tracks are favorites of DJs in the drum n' bass arena and enjoyable documents of a true original in pioneering the jungle and ragga styles of hardcore dance music. Maybe to the dismay of ebay entrepreneurs, Planet Mu has put together a 3xLP and compact disc compilation
    more

  • Remarc: Sound Murderer

    Remarc - Sound Murderer

    Reviewed by Jess Harvell (www.citypages.com)

    <b> Remarc </b> - Sound Murderer


    It all started with an offhand display of funkiness. A minor gospel R&B band called the Winstons went into a studio in 1969 to record a single, and the drummer cut a solo percussion break in the middle of the negligible B-side, an instrumental called "Amen, My Brother." It was a driving, slip surge of snare and ride cymbal, totally perfunctory--the kind of thing the drummer had probably done a thousand times in a thousand different ways. The
    more

  • Remarc - Sound Murderer (Planet Mu)

    Remarc - Sound Murderer

    Reviewed by Vaughan Healey (cyclic defrost)

    <b> Remarc </b> - Sound Murderer

    The first jungilist record I ever bought was Remarc’s Sound Murderer on Whitehouse Records, so I was pretty excited when Planet Mu said they were going to reissue his back catalogue. Back then, it was music with no equivalent, cacophonous anti-music with no resemblance to anything I had heard before. Through the 1990’s, Remarc became infamous for the most twisted and extreme jungilist music around. Remarc releases were scarce and obscure with
    more