• Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    mr. snares never ceases to surprise me with his versatility. this is a third release for him on planet mu, and yet another music style. "songs about my cats" is a step towards idm, a step taken from "making orange things," as opposed to "shiver in eternal darkness" or "salt."

    I was rather hesitant at first, not knowing what to think of the album. I loved the way "making orange things" combined aggression and broken, unpredictable percussion.
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  • Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    As if Mike Paradinas didn’t have enough odd back catalogue, Aaron Funk laysdown a concept album about the four felines who extend their companionship into his Winnipeg studio. As bizarre pretenses go, this is certainly out there but aside from the occasional title reference and frankly frightening cover art there is little here to conjour images of the furry beasts ­ Funk explaining that he took more inspiration than execution. Though certainly
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  • Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    Reviewed by TM (Other Music)

    Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    Aaron Funk is a 20-year old from Winnipeg who has recorded no fewer than 12 EPs in the past 18 months. There is not a dud amongst them. Try throwing on his "Greg Hates Car Culture" EP (History of the Future) and you'll see why new electronic hardcore is really the new punk. Alec Empire and his DHR acolytes gave it a stab, but their shouted faux left-wing vocals and lack of sonic diversity led to the defection of many artists from the label. Venetian
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  • Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    Reviewed by Stephen Dalton (UNCUT)

    Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    The post-Aphex school of British avant-tronica is one of the last places in music where wildly dissonant noises still co-exist with progressive pop sensibilities. Venetian Snares mastermind Aaron Funk is as experimental as fuck yet these chaotic splatterbeats and twisted Fisher Price melodies would be accesible to the average hyperactive nine-year-old who recognises odious "kiddy" bands like Hear'Say for the hideaously middle-aged tripe they are.
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