• Jega - Spectrum

    <b> Jega </b> - Spectrum

    New York's Matador Records has long been known for its incredibly high quality indie rock releases, and they've got some of the biggest names in the business on their roster to support my claim: Pavement, Yo La Tengo, Liz Phair, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Guided By Voices... and the list goes on. But the label's never had a big selection of electronic music, until now.

    Lately, Matador's offerings have been growing more diverse. And now that experimental
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  • Jega - Spectrum

    <b> Jega </b> - Spectrum

    I was surprised to see this record picked up for major Stateside promotion. Much of the material strays far from accessibility, lingering instead in odd rhythms and queasy synth sounds, with the occasional foray into jungle's bucktoothed cousin, drill and bass. Dylan Nathan built his reputation as Jega on the mighty Skam label out of Sheffield, but unlike his often minimalist label mates, he will often go for rather thick production. Obvious parallels are to older
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  • Jega - Spectrum

    <b> Jega </b> - Spectrum

    Since i adore U-Ziq so much, then anything he releases on his very own label is surely worth investigating, so that is why i bought this cd without hearing a thing about them first. I know Jega has released a few things on the Skam label from Manchester, and also some tracks on compilations, so i was very interested to see if this would live up to the high quality of Mike Paradinas own releases as U-Ziq. Well i have to say that there is a lot of potential there, and
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  • "this rocks"

    Jega - Spectrum

    Reviewed by Carl Glaser Source: (ink19)

    <b> Jega </b> - Spectrum

    Weather Report and Aphex Twin. Jean-Michael Jarre and Atari Teenage Riot. Not names I'd ordinarily associate, but in a few instances, Jega manages to bring these un-conceived pairings to mind. Jega, aka Dylan Nathan, is a protégé of Mike Paradinas, and according to British Press is a pioneer of the aptly-titled "drill 'n' bass" scene. "Red Mullet" has a jazzy swing to it that belies the electronic analog sounds powering the song. The subsequent "Nia" could easily
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