• MRK1 - Copyright Laws

    Reviewed by Plan B

    <b> MRK1 </b> - Copyright Laws

    The last few years have seen Manchester's MRK1 - formerly Mark One-swing from hollowed-out bass to brackish urban grime as the musical facet of Manchester crew Virus Syndicate. 'Copyright Laws' is perhaps the flipside to the burial album's hauntological, washed-out feel-still minimal, but muscular and fully corporeal, a ribcage-rattling prescence rather than a faded memory. Dubstep has a history of surfing ethnic sources for the atmospheric sonic, but
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    Reviewed by The Silent Ballet

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    Okay, it’s a given that Luke Vibert brings the ‘hurt’. I mean, come on, it rhymes. One needs to only look at ‘I before E except after C’ or ‘beer before liquor; get sick quicker’ to validate this belief of if-it’s-true-it-must-rhyme-ism. Further proof on this universal law can be seen on track 6, “Clikilik”, but let’s pause for a bit before we get too far into Chicago, Detroit, Redruth (it’s Luke’s hometown if you’re
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  • MRK1 - Copyright Laws

    Reviewed by Boomkat

    <b> MRK1 </b> - Copyright Laws

    First coming to the attention through his caustic production for Manchester's Virus Syndicate, MRK 1 (aka Mark One) returns to the mighty Mu with new album 'Copyright Laws' - a record which sees a throbbing dubstep heart stepping out on the town with all manner of styles and production adjuncts in tow. A real evolution from 'One Way', 'Copyright Laws' sees MRK 1 spooling in sub-blows and eroded urban fragments galore, creating a textured vision of
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  • Luke Vibert - Chicago,Detroit,Redruth

    Reviewed by Boomkat

    <b> Luke Vibert </b> - Chicago,Detroit,Redruth

    Another month, another Luke Vibert album, but this latest for Planet Mu (his second to be exact) is different, mainly because it's released under (shock horror!) his own name. Yep the man otherwise known as Plug, Wagon Christ, Ace of Clubs, Kerrier District, Spac Hand Luke, Amen Andrews and many, many other weird and womderful names has ditched all the pseudonyms yet again to come up with a rounded collection of tracks which borrow liberally from his
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