• Venetian Snares & Speedranch - Making Orange Things

    Reviewed by Tom Mugridge (Muzik)

    Venetian Snares & Speedranch - Making Orange Things

    "But when it sounds this good who cares?" reviewers like to say when they've outlined several reasons why a record is rubbish but want you to buy it anyway, usually because it's by their mate, or it's currently trendy. Venetian Snares makes deeply unfashionable speedcore breakbeat; Speedranch is by all accounts thoroughly unpleasant (and a "singer" in the sense that a dentist's drill is a "musical instrument"); and "Orange Things" is by turns puerile, unlistenable and deliberately obnoxious. But in all honesty, when it sounds this good...

    3/5

  • Venetian Snares & Speedranch - Making Orange Things

    Reviewed by Tim diGravina (all music guide)

    Venetian Snares & Speedranch - Making Orange Things

    Making Orange Things is the result of an Internet collaboration between Canadian Aaron Funk (aka Venetian Snares) and U.K. noise-addict Speedranch. From the get go, sonic assault is the goal. While it's hard to call anything on the album a melody, pleasant musical flourishes are buried beneath the squalid walls of noise. Bits of mad Caustic Window screeching nestle violently alongside loads of Skinny Puppy-style cut-and-paste sample trickery and V/Vm
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  • Joseph Nothing - Dummy Variations

    Reviewed by [R.E.] (Other Music)

    Joseph Nothing - Dummy Variations

    Nothing, aka Tatsuya Joseph Yoshida, makes an album with a strange conflict. While it's a nice trip through, it has no center to speak of. This is Yoshida's first album solo, but he's worked in Japanese studios for a long time. His work is all texture and no form. He arranges textures (and hundreds of them, not just twenty or thirty) into complex arrangements that build into rhythms, but not simple ones. He'll make a formula for a five-second
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  • Joseph Nothing - Dummy Variations

    Joseph Nothing - Dummy Variations

    Tatsuya Yoshida, as he is known to his parents, releases his first album under his Joseph Nothing moniker on Michael Paradinas’ Planet Mu label. Reminiscent of both Paradinas’ µ-ziq and Richard D. James’ Aphex Twin projects, Yoshida also brings his own personality to a funky and imaginative record.
    All along this album, the shadows of his masters are present, especially on tracks like A Shine On Your Head or Ballad For The Unloved, where
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