• Mark One - One Way

    Reviewed by Alex (dot-alt.com)

    <b> Mark One </b> - One Way

    In London the major label free-for-all signing of grime artists continues and the hype is verging on the ridiculous. Meanwhile in Manchester, MarkOne and the Virus Syndicate MCs drop an album on an IDM label and it's like hardly anyone really even noticed.

    Distinctly different from the clicky, militaristic state-of-the-art sound of London grime, MarkOne's productions combine the breaks of older garage with towering DNB basslines. The results
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  • Mark One - One Way

    Reviewed by k-punk (k-punk)

    <b> Mark One </b> - One Way

    It needed someone outside the capital to synthesize the East and South London Grime sounds. The Billingsgate verbal frenzy of the East and the depopulated post-nuclear Croydon ring road of the South have been met in Manchester, on a ‘Dance’ music LP that, gratifyingly, is compulsive over its full length, The album actually outstrips the potential displayed on the MarkOne tracks from Rephlex’s brilliant Grime comp. It leers and lurches with a
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  • Mark One - One Way

    Reviewed by kek-w (kid shirt)

    <b> Mark One </b> - One Way

    The new Mark One LP on Planet Mu is fucking excellent, by the way.
    A nice mixture of dense, brooding, Grimey/Sub-Lo skunkstrimentals and upliftingly-grubby little shoutalongs spread across three thick slabs of vinyl. Detuned square-wave synth-sounds give an early Warp Records/Bleep vibe to a couple of tracks, while others seem to revel in oppressive, paranoid beats and orchestral-stabs worthy of mid-period Cabaret Voltaire: you can almost hear the
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  • Mark One - One Way

    Reviewed by Corey H. Maass (igloomag.com)

    <b> Mark One </b> - One Way

    Mark One's One Way is one of the first full length grime albums that has received a lot of attention outside the UK. Grime, itself a sub-genre of UK Garage, has been getting a lot of attention in the UK and Europe, but I fear it'll pass America by as so many other styles. Too bad, as it perpetuates UK rap as something completely separate from the US as well as the harder, darker side of garage, like techstep or drill-n-bass was to drum-n-bass.
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