• µ-Ziq - Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique

    Reviewed by smallfish

    <b> µ-Ziq </b> - Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique

    I must admit I was slightly concerned about this release (mainly due to the grisly cover artwork). However I needn't have worried as it turns out because this is a classic slab of Mike Paradinas electronica. And by that I mean I really like it! Comes across like an updated, slightly modernised version of Tango n Vectif or Bluff Limbo at times with some wonderfully odd melodic moments and a collection of eclectic, funky, weird and just plain brilliant
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  • µ-Ziq - Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique

    Reviewed by Boomkat

    <b> µ-Ziq </b> - Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique

    The break-up album, it's the way otherwise totally autistic musicians (read : most of them) manage to tell the outside world how they're feeling, and few have left less to the imagination than electronica old-skooler and Planet Mu boss Mike Paradinas on the cover art of this latest full-length. 'Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique' as if you didn't get the idea from the title is an album which goes through the break-up of Paradinas and
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  • Hypnotherapy.

    µ-Ziq - Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique

    Reviewed by BBC

    <b> µ-Ziq </b> - Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique

    Fans of early µ-ziq releases such as Tango N’ Vectif will be pleased to hear that, for his eighth album, Mike Paradinas has turned his back on the groove-less drum’n’bass assaults that have made up much of his recent output. He’s opted instead for stripped, hypnotic rhythms and lush-but-seasick melodies. This kind of woozy electronica may not dazzle in the way it did back in its mid-90s heyday, but there’s still a dizzying kind of fun to
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  • Apparently any profits from this record will go to St. Bernadetta's Synth Hospital.

    Last Step - Last Step

    Reviewed by NME

    <b> Last Step </b> - Last Step


    If Klaxon's sampler has a drink problem (beer spilled on the motherboard, perhaps) or their favourite synth is missing a crucial knob, this, NME imagines, is where they recover. But the mysterious Canadian behind "Last Step" doesn't need to rely on good deeds to win over NME's affections. Rocking the retro analogue synth sounds of DMX Krew and the pop sensibilities of early Depeche Mode, but given, like Aphex Twin, to schizoid lurches in tempo
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