• Kuedo Severant

    Kuedo - Severant

    Reviewed by Unknown Source: (Sputnik Music)

    <b> Kuedo </b> - Severant

    As one half of the aggressive and industrial-tinged dubstep outfit Vex’d, Jamie Teasdale unwittingly became a champion for the expansive crowd of hard-edged bass enthusiasts who craft their music like car crashes, where everything just sounds like a tangled web of bent steel. But now shifting identities to the new moniker of Kuedo, Teasdale is eager to re-invent himself as a futurist pioneer, now having little to do with the aggro frustration of dubstep. What was
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  • Kuedo - Severant

    Kuedo - Severant

    Reviewed by Daniel Paton Source: (MusicOMH)

    <b> Kuedo </b> - Severant

    As one half of Vex’d, Jamie Teasdale played a substantial role in the development of the dubstep scene. Like many of his contemporaries, he has veered out into territory less easy to classify or define. Severant is his debut album under the Kuedo moniker. Although markedly less fragmented, it shares with Zomby’s recent Dedication a somewhat fuzzy, hallucinogenic quality and a desire to fuse the mechanics of electronic music with something warmer and more
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  • Chrissy Murderbot Women’s Studies

    Chrissy Murderbot - Women's Studies

    Reviewed by Robin Howells Source: (Playground)

    <b> Chrissy Murderbot </b> - Women's Studies

    Some might know Chrissy Murderbot for nth-generation jungle productions on several US labels, but more might be familiar with him as a DJ who describes himself being in love with “juke-rave-jungle-disco-tropical-hi-NRG-gangsta-garage-core”. On his blog he offers a mind-boggling lexicon of mixes, recently having uploaded one a week for a whole year – compressed 101s on everything from New Jack Swing to Neue Deutsche Welle, via bassline house and Belgian
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  • Chrissy Murderbot Women’s Studies Review

    Chrissy Murderbot - Women's Studies

    Reviewed by Paul Clarke Source: (BBC Music)

    <b> Chrissy Murderbot </b> - Women's Studies

    A mutation of ghetto house, juke is the soundtrack to footwork competitions in Chicago, where battling dancers perform frenetic displays that resemble – to the untrained eye – moonwalking over hot coals. But for anyone outside the Windy City, exploring the scene was liable to leave you feeling as clueless as if you’d just attempted a footwork dance yourself. There was plenty of footage of dance crews like HaVoC or tracks from producers like Taxman floating
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