• Jega - Geometry

    Reviewed by Peter Orlov (CMJ New Music)

    Jega - Geometry

    Forget rocking simple blocks. Jega's all about sculpting high-end, abstract beat architecture, blowing it to smithereens, then watching where the sonic shrapnel lands. Digitally abrasive almost beyond the call of art on his '98 debut, Dylan "Jega" Nathan's new Geometry actually finds him reeling in his rhythmic prowess toward something that, at times, approaches contemplation. Not that he doesn't still enjoy acting like a hyper grad student running amok with a
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  • Jega - Geometry

    Reviewed by Sarah Mearon (The Stanford Daily)

    Jega - Geometry

    With its deluge of digital distortion and spasmatic beats, Jega's second album is an inspired creation of electronic sound. "Geometry" is a mix of perturbed beatitudes that is nonetheless a thematic album unified by chaos. Hailing from Manchester, England, Jega is 26-year-old Dylan Nathan, a former architecture school student whose raw talent was originally captured on several seven-inch and twelve-inch E.P.s from a few small U.K. labels. "Spectrum" was his first
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  • Jega - Geometry

    Reviewed by Markkus Rovito (Harmony Central)

    Jega - Geometry

    I offer up Geometry as further proof that all the equipment needed to make futuristic music was made in the '80s. Though I could be mistaken, the vintage drum sounds, analog synths, metallic bells and drones, and occasional samples suggest that Jega (a.k.a. Dylan Nathan of Manchester, England) spends many an evening in his bedroom accompanied only by his DX7s, Prophet synths, Roland drum machines, and primitive samplers. [the album was created entirely on a G3 Mac and
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  • Jega - Geometry

    Reviewed by Brian Gettler (Cardinal.com)

    Jega - Geometry

    Jega, a.k.a. Dylan J. Nathan, is obsessed with technology. As any good electronic artist knows, the world of computerized musical goodies provides an excellent basis for some fine-sounding tunes. Geometry, however, takes this ideology to a whole new level. Cinematic in scope and Commodore-based gaming in sound, Jega has produced an outstanding album that seems to deny the presence of human hands in its creation.

    Sounding like a nervous Star Trek-worshipping
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