• Luke Vibert - '95-'99

    Reviewed by matthijs (Beats mag)

    Luke Vibert - '95-'99

    Everyone's favorite sampling loon Luke Vibert (Wagon Christ, Plug) returns with a cute twelve inch supposedly filled with leftovers from his youth. Not that this youth took place all that long ago, but if you compare the tracks on this disc to those on his more recent offerings, you get the distinct impression that someone has been through an inordinate amount of growth over the past few years. Is this the same Luke Vibert who stopped a nice, easy tearjerker halfway
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  • Luke Vibert - '95-'99

    Reviewed by Chris Z (Re:mote Induction)

    Luke Vibert - '95-'99

    Releasing several things as Plug and Wagon Christ, Luke Vibert has established himself in several musical circles - drum 'n bass, hip-hop, trip-hop, etc. On his newest release on mu-ziq's Planet Mu, he includes four songs recorded, I suppose, from 1995 to 1999 - and like I expected, they're very good. I only wish there was more of it.

    Luke Vibert's solo style is a sort of funky hip-hop type thing that would feel right at home on a label like Ninja Tune. If music
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  • Rating: 6.5

    Jega - Geometry

    Reviewed by Sam Eccleston (Pitchfork)

    Jega - Geometry

    There's an old quip that writing about art is like dancing about architecture. (Yes, that old thing.) Well, Jega went to architecture school with ยต-ziq and Aphex Twin, so he'd know more about that than most. Unsurprisingly, Jega sounds not unlike his better-known classmates. Falling squarely into the this-is-techno-but-don't-dance-to-it camp, Dylan Nathan tics and quirks like any addled British gent with too much time, an ugly beard (I presume) and an 808 should.
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  • Jega - Geometry

    Reviewed by Andrew Midgley (Igloomag.com)

    Jega - Geometry

    It's easy to step back in awe when hearing a release that covers so much electronic ground, from cutting-edge cut-up digital distortion, to warm analog melodies, to video-game noise. The album opens with "Alternating Bit," an ominous intro that keeps a rising crescendo going for the entire length of the track, not serving to build up the climax of the track itself, but to build up to the mind-numbing tracks that follow. "Syntax Tree" and "Breakpoint Envelope" are pure
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