• "Faster, harder, faster, harder, faster and much harder"

    Hellfish & Producer - Constant Mutation (Mixed)

    Reviewed by Keith Cameron (netbeat)

    Hellfish & Producer - Constant Mutation (Mixed)

    Constant Mutation is a continuous mix album featuring tracks released on the Deathchant, Rebel Scum and Psychik Genocide labels between 1998 and 2000. The best description for the original music is probably ‘gabba’ and features relentless rapid-fire beats.

    Kicking off in (literally) explosive style, Constant Mutation opens with a series of increasingly manipulated explosions. This track, “Kicks In Unparalleled”, is mixed into “No More Rock ‘n’
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  • Hellfish & Producer - Constant Mutation (Mixed)

    Reviewed by Paul Lloyd (Elektronik.co.uk)

    Hellfish & Producer - Constant Mutation (Mixed)

    Constant Mutation is a continuous mix album featuring tracks released on the Deathchant, Rebel Scum and Psychik Genocide labels between 1998 and 2000. The best description for the original music is probably ‘gabba’ and features relentless rapid-fire beats.

    Kicking off in (literally) explosive style, Constant Mutation opens with a series of increasingly manipulated explosions. This track, “Kicks In Unparalleled”, is mixed into “No More Rock ‘n’
    more

  • Leafcutter John - Microcontact

    Leafcutter John - Microcontact

    John Burton, aka Leafcutter John, born in West Yorkshire, originally wanted to be a painter, and studied at Norwich School Of Art. Burton was also a songwriter, spending his spare time composing folk songs on a guitar. Them one day, he bought a PC, to type his university assignments. That’s when he discovered the possibilities of electronic music. That was four years ago…
    At the time, Burton didn’t own any electronic music records, but, fortunately, some
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  • Leafcutter John - Microcontact

    Reviewed by Paul Lloyd (Grooves mag)

    Leafcutter John - Microcontact

    With this album, Burton’s sound has noticeably progressed. Each track is now increasingly abstract yet carefully and deliberately constructed. None of the tracks set out to be linear or repetitive, shifting all the time in an abstract but not overly complex manner. Simple music box melodies are combined with all manner of subtly utilised samples and glitchy metallic beats. As with the “Concourse EP”, each track on “Microcontact” is a subset of elements that
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