• Veteran avant-rocker converts to electronica, with some success

    Electric Company - Slow Food

    Reviewed by John Mulvey (UNCUT)

    Electric Company - Slow Food

    As drummer in Eighties LA band Savage Republic, Brad Laner helped initiate the sombre dirge-rock later perfected by Godspeed You Black Emperor! In the early-Nineties, he fronted Medecine, who introduced aggresive shoegazing to America and made a decent record for Creation. An alleged 300 albums later, the protean Laner trades as Electric Company and occasionally adds guitar feedback to a host of fashionably messed-up digital glitches and chirrups. The likes of "Un
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  • Electric Company - Slow Food

    Reviewed by Gal Detourn (iDJ)

    Electric Company - Slow Food

    Brad Laner, AKA Electric Company, makes odball, glitchy electronica that is informed by both the "playful" and "futuristic" ends of the spectrum. His desire to play the avant card, instead of simply letting rip, does get monotonous, but there are still plenty of bonkers moments to savour. "Yresbo", for example, is a mad carousel where mellow funk meets whaked out electronics, whilst "New Imbalance" is a stomping playful beast that mutates into a frenetic arcade game
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  • Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    mr. snares never ceases to surprise me with his versatility. this is a third release for him on planet mu, and yet another music style. "songs about my cats" is a step towards idm, a step taken from "making orange things," as opposed to "shiver in eternal darkness" or "salt."

    I was rather hesitant at first, not knowing what to think of the album. I loved the way "making orange things" combined aggression and broken, unpredictable percussion. the stuff was
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  • Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    Venetian Snares - Songs About My Cats

    As if Mike Paradinas didn’t have enough odd back catalogue, Aaron Funk laysdown a concept album about the four felines who extend their companionship into his Winnipeg studio. As bizarre pretenses go, this is certainly out there but aside from the occasional title reference and frankly frightening cover art there is little here to conjour images of the furry beasts ­ Funk explaining that he took more inspiration than execution. Though certainly less psychotic than
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