• Electronic Music Composer - Abandon Music

    <b> Electronic Music Composer </b> - Abandon Music

    Whilst the name Electronic Music Composer may sound like the kind of thing they gave away as prizes to slavering teens on Blockbuster back in the day, it is in fact the collaborative project of Ian Read and Eight Frozen Modules' Ken Gibson. Coming at you like a snarling electronic bison, EMC are straight at your throats with the rotating beats and acid dusted peaks of the dancehall influenced 'Everything New is Old'. Taking a leaf out of Bogdan Raczynski's less pink
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  • Electronic Music Composer - Abandon Music

    Reviewed by The Wire (The Wire)

    <b> Electronic Music Composer </b> - Abandon Music

    This prosaically monikered outfit features Ken Gibson from Eight Frozen Modules working alongside Ian Read. 'Abandon Music' is bypical, if superior fare from Planet Mu - twisting, drilled beats underpinning analogue trompe l'oeil effects and waked out sample interruptions. All your favorite IDM signifiers are present and correct, corralled into perfect formation by the prodigiously gifted prorammers. What makes the album stand out, however, are its dubbier
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  • The Gasman - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    Reviewed by Lawrence English (Time off)

    <b> The Gasman </b> - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    Chris Reeves, the Portsmouth-based musician otherwise known as The Gasman, has what can only be assumed to be a very short attention span… or a love of simply ramming unusual musical shapes together.

    As the title suggests, this record is a treasure trove of change, a majestic journey through experiments in melody and groove. Drawing on the techno movements of countries like Belgium in the early 90s, we’re treated to some of eccentric electronic music’s
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  • The Gasman - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    Reviewed by Ben Murphy (DJ magazine)

    <b> The Gasman </b> - The Grand Electric Palace Of Variety

    The Gasman in question is less like a fellow that changes extortionate amounts to fix your boiler, and more like an amorphous phantom obsessed with odd ambience. Chris Reeves' new double album is a trip into haunted territory over two CDs. On CD1, the largely beatless electronics conceal deep layers of melody and invention. CD2, meanwhile, throws crazed beats into the heady melodic mixture. On 'Broken CD Player' he cuts up the normally irritating sound of the
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