• Chrissy Murderbot Women's Studies

    Chrissy Murderbot - Women's Studies

    Reviewed by Andrew Gaerig Source: (Pitchfork)

    <b> Chrissy Murderbot </b> - Women's Studies

    Chrissy Murderbot is your friendly neighborhood Diplo: a pan-global dance synthesist who believes that backing an entire four-minute track with a looping police siren is a good idea. Unlike Diplo or even Girl Talk, though, Chrissy isn't interested in connecting his genre obsessions with modern North American hip-hop or R&B, meaning Women's Studies features no hint of pop crossover. It's the difference between believing something like dancehall deserves a wider
    more

  • NastyNasty: ‘No Names’

    NastyNasty - No Names

    Reviewed by Andrew Ryce Source: (Fact Magazine)

    NastyNasty - No Names

    The US dubstep juggernaut rolls on, and apparently it’s invading the UK. NastyNasty is a Bay Area staple who finds himself at the more deranged end of things, consuming dubstep, electro, crunk and hip-hop into sludgy American party music of the highest (or lowest) order. With the previous releases coming on American labels like Frite Nite and Seclusias, a release on a UK label like Planet Mu feels like a landmark for Jasper Reeder.

    It’s odd to see Planet Mu
    more

  • Boxcutter The Dissolve

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by George Bass Source: (Coke Machine Glow)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    If you look up Boxcutter on dubstepforum.net, you’ll see the Irishman’s appearances are akin to Halley’s Comet: infrequent, blazing, not seen by nearly enough people. It isn’t his fault the scene’s become crowded with kids in search of inner ear damage. Perhaps that’s why The Dissolve, Barry Lynn’s fourth full-length, takes bolder and bolder scalpel strokes to create 49 minutes of dubstep, trying so hard to be the opposite of the rain-lashed muggings
    more

  • Boxcutter – The Dissolve

    Boxcutter - The Dissolve

    Reviewed by Patrick Fennelly Source: (State Magazine)

    <b> Boxcutter </b> - The Dissolve

    When people think of electronic music it is usually Warp Records or Ninja Tune/Big Dada that gets all the plaudits. However it is Planet Mu and its founder Mike Paradinas, that has, for 16 years now, produced consistently good electronica and dance music, yet is often forced to live in the shadow of the former dance giants. It is the slightly more obscure variation of artists that has, perhaps, left Planet Mu in the dark a little, however, Northern Ireland’s
    more